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Tennessee’s Child Health Week

Child Health Week 2014

October 6-12, 2014

“A Healthy Tennessee Begins with a Healthy Me!”

photo of babiesThe health and well-being of our children is fundamental to the future progress of our state. As Child Health Day, a national event first proclaimed by President Calvin Coolidge in 1928, celebrates its 87th observance this year, the State of Tennessee has set apart a special week to focus on the health and well-being of its children.

Many efforts are in place across Tennessee to promote the health of children. For example, programs like GetFitTN, Project Diabetes and Coordinated School Health offer community-driven approaches to partnering with families, teachers and other caregivers. Initiatives like TENNderCARE, CoverKids, and Children’s Special Services ensure that children have access to recommended preventive care and resources needed to manage childhood illnesses. Other programs like WIC, the State Immunization Program and the Newborn Screening Program make sure young children get a healthy start on life. Collectively, these efforts, along with many others, make it easier for parents to help children live healthier lives and prepare for a healthy future.photo of children

Every Tennessean can have a positive impact on the health and well-being of children. Parents can help their kids stay active and encourage healthy eating habits. Schools and communities can create environments that foster healthy lifestyles. Health providers can promote regular checkups and immunizations and help children and families manage childhood diseases. Together, we can secure a healthier future for all of Tennessee's children.

 


Events Calendar


Child Health Week: October 6-12, 2014

Governor Bill Haslam has proclaimed October 6-12, 2014 as Child Health Week in Tennessee. This year's theme is "A Healthy Tennessee Begins with a Healthy Me!"

Additional information and resources for Child Health Week 2014 are provided below. For more information about Child Health, contact the Department of Health, Division of Maternal and Child Health at (615) 741-7353.


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The health and well-being of our children is fundamental to the future progress of our state. As Child Health Day, a national event first proclaimed by President Calvin Coolidge in 1928, celebrates its 87th observance this year, the state of Tennessee has set apart a special week to focus on the health and well-being of its children.

Many efforts are in place across Tennessee to promote the health of children. Programs like GetFitTN, Project Diabetes and Coordinated School Health offer community-driven approaches to partnering with families, teachers and other caregivers. Initiatives like TENNderCARE, CoverKids, and Children’s Special Services ensure that children have access to recommended preventive care and resources needed to manage childhood illness. Other programs, like WIC, the State Immunization Program, and the Newborn Screening Program make sure that young children get a healthy start on life. Collectively, these efforts and many others make it easier for parents to help children live healthier lives and prepare for a healthy future.

Every Tennessean can have a positive impact on the health and well being of children. Parents can help their kids stay active and encourage healthy eating habits. Schools and communities can create environments that foster healthy lifestyles. Health providers can promote regular checkups and immunizations and help children and families manage childhood diseases. Together, we can secure a healthier future for all of Tennessee's children.

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Parents

Child Health Week 2014 will focus on the many ways to keep children healthy in order to have a healthy, productive future. Celebrate Child Health Week by helping our state’s children and families to lead healthy lives and make good health choices!

How Can You Keep your Child Healthy?

  • Make your own health a priority—you are your child’s best role model!
  • Make sure your child gets regular checkups from his or her primary care provider.
  • Protect your family from vaccine-preventable diseases by making sure that everyone gets the shots they need.
    Remember everyone needs the flu shot every year!
  • Encourage your child to talk to you or an adult that they trust if they are sad or blue, or nervous or scared.
  • Know if anyone in your family is allergic to any medicines or has any health problems. 
    Keep your health records in one place so that you can find them easily.
  • Help your child to get a good night’s sleep every night.
  • Encourage your child to wash their hands often!
  • Teach your children to cover their mouth with their elbow when they cough or sneeze.
  • Keep your kids safe by making sure everyone is wearing their seat belt or is in a proper car seat.
  • Have water as your family’s primary drink. 
    Limit the amount of sugar-sweetened beverages like sodas and juice.
  • Let your kids get out and play or exercise for at least 60 minutes every day. Better yet, get out there with them!
  • Eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables every day.
  • Limit screen time (television, computers, video games) to two hours every day.
  • Eat meals together as a family.
  • Talk to your child and their school about bullying.

Need More Information?

For more information or resources, check out our website: health.tn.gov/mch or call us at 615-741-7353.


Resource Links for Parents

The Gold Sneaker Initiative was developed to enhance policy related to health and wellness within licensed child care facilities across Tennessee. http://health.tn.gov/Goldsneaker/index.htm

United Healthcare

4Girls.gov
Be Healthy. Be Happy. Be You. Beautiful.

KidsHealth -
kidshealth.org/parent/

Healthy Homes-Good Health Begins at Homes
http://health.tn.gov/healthyhomes/

Best Bones Forever

A LEA must permit possession and self-administration of a prescribed, metered dosage, asthma-reliever inhaler as long as certain conditions are met. To learn more, refer to this site: http://tennessee.gov/sos/acts/103/pub/pc0493.pdf

American Lung Association of Tennessee - The American Lung Association's mission is to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease through Education, Advocacy and Research. www.lung.org/associations/charters/midland-states/

Family Doctor.org
Health information for the whole family

Communication: Fostering Family Centered Communication
http://www.pediatricsinpractice.org/pdfs/Communication/Communication_handout1-1-r.pdf

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Kids Health.org

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Distraction.gov

Tennessee Governor’s Highway Safety Office

United Healthcare

American Dental Association

The Teen Years Explained: A Guide to Healthy Adolescent Development
sparkaction.org/content/teen-years-explained-guide-healthy-adolesc

Tennessee Family Resource Centers
www.tn.gov/education/earlylearning/frcs.shtml

Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning
csefel.vanderbilt.edu

Immunizations Schedules
www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
www.samhsa.gov

Zero to Three
www.zerotothree.org

Lungtropolis, Helping Your Child Manage Asthma
www.lungtropolis.com/1010/

American Lung Association
www.lung.org/associations/states/tennessee/

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America
www.aafa.org/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute:

Let’s Move—America’s Move to Raise a Healthier Generation of Kids:
www.letsmove.gov/

Helping your overweight child:
win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/over_child.htm

We Can! Tips to Eat Well and Move More:
www.wellnessproposals.com/fitness/fitness-programs/healthy-weight-eat-well-move-more.pdf

Choose My Plate: 
www.choosemyplate.gov/

Healthy Recipes:
www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy_eating/recipes.html

Body Mass Index Calculator for children & teens:
apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Calculator.aspx

Portion Distortion:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/wecan/eat-right/portion-distortion.htm

United States Department of Agriculture Team Nutrition:
www.fns.usda.gov/tn/team-nutrition


Just for Kids — information, games, activities & more!

Quest for the Code, Asthma Education Game
asthma.starlight.org/

Lungtropolis, Asthma Education Game
www.lungtropolis.com/lungtropolis/accounts/login/

BAM! Body and Mind:
www.bam.gov

Best Bones Forever:
www.bestbonesforever.gov/

United States Department of Agriculture

My Pyramid Games:
myplategames.com

Music Based Health Communications: 
www.groovypyramid.com/index.htm

Get Fit TN:
www.getfit.tn.gov/kids/

4Girls.gov
Be Healthy. Be Happy. Be You. Beautiful.

Young Men’s Health

KidsHealth
kidshealth.org/parent/

Office of Adolescent Health

Best Bones Forever

United Healthcare

Kids Health.org

American Dental Association

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Health Providers

Schools

How Can You Participate?

  • Write a column in a school newsletter or op-ed in your local paper about a child health topic
  • Add a message about a health topic to your office phone message
  • Speak to a community organization, classroom or parent-teacher organization about healthy
    lifestyles for children
  • Lead a community fitness event, like a walk in the park
  • Volunteer to hold a BMI or blood pressure screening
  • Initiate a quality improvement project in your clinic, focused on reducing missed opportunities to provide preventive care (checkups and immunizations)
  • Hold staff in-service trainings to remind all staff about the latest recommendations for preventive care
  • Host a “healthy recipe” contest in your office and let your patients be the judge
  • Have your patients draw pictures related to healthy living and display them in your office
    during Child Health Week
  • Visit a local school and talk with students and staff about healthy lifestyles
  • Be a good role model for your patients
  • Issue a physical activity or healthy eating challenge for your staff

Need More Information?

For more information or resources, check out our website: health.tn.gov/mch or call us at 615-741-7353.


Resource Links for Health Providers

General Information

A LEA must permit possession and self-administration of a prescribed, metered dosage, asthma-reliever inhaler as long as certain conditions are met. To learn more, refer to this site: http://tennessee.gov/sos/acts/103/pub/pc0493.pdf

CDC Immunizations Schedules
www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/

Injury and Violence Prevention and Control
  www.cdc.gov/injury/

United Healthcare

Blue Cross Blue Shield

  • Good Health Club
    Physician Toolkit - The Good Health Club promotes healthy choices and behaviors in children through fun, effective, age-appropriate communications. The Toolkit contains convenient physician reference information as well as behavior-changing educational tools to share with patients and parents.
    www.bcbst.com/providers/Good_Health_Toolkit/default.shtml

Bright Futures Periodicity Schedule for Preventive Care
http://brightfutures.aap.org/clinical_practice.html

TENNderCare (TennCare’s EPSDT program)
www.state.tn.us/tenncare/tenndercare/

Interactive Asthma Action Plan Resource Tool
Assess, Monitor and Manage Asthma


Resources for Preventing and Treating Childhood Obesity

The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/112/2/424.full?sid=83520b01-94c7-4323-a0fe-e4dbb5db1197

American Academy of Pediatrics Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight
www.aap.org/obesity/about.html

AAP Policy Statement:
Prevention of Pediatric Overweight & Obesity
aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/pediatrics;112/2/424.pdf

AAP Policy Statement: 
Active Healthy Living: Prevention of Childhood Obesity through Increased Physical Activity
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/117/5/1834.full?sid=9e82602c-d3a1-44de-88de-229dc025426b

American Heart Association:
Dietary Recommendations for Children and Adolescents: A Guide for Practitioners
circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/112/13/2061

AAP Clinical Report: 
Lipid Screening and Cardiovascular Health in Childhood
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/122/1/198.full?sid=edd4b927-e57e-466b-a2e3-eece2b3c208f

AAP Clinical Report: 
Promoting the Participation of Children with Disabilities in Sports, Recreation and Physical Activities
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/121/5/1057.full?sid=3db43b77-b5f9-49cd-8216-b74f4eca5bd1

AAP Clinical Report:
Optimizing Bone Health and Calcium Intakes of Infants, Children and Adolescents
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/117/2/578.full?sid=84b50d5a-0e6e-4fdd-89de-7e981ff9c251

AAP Policy Statement:
Promotion of Healthy Weight Control Practices in Young Athletes
pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/116/6/1557.full?sid=245e6909-d8a1-4509-bcdc-809c04a928a2

American Heart Association: 
Overweight in Children and Adolescents: Pathophysiology, Consequences, Prevention & Treatment
circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/111/15/1999?ck=nck

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Schools

How Can Your School Participate?

  • Add health information to your morning announcements
  • Write a column in your school newsletter or local newspaper about a child health topic
  • Write an editorial in your local newspaper about the importance of school health programs
  • Hold a Body Mass Index screening for students and staff
  • Host a health fair with educational activities and games
  • Have an open house for your school clinic or Coordinated School Health program
  • Have student athletes from the high school speak to youth about nutrition and exercise
  • Organize a cook-off for healthy foods and let students be the judge
  • Plan hands-on activities, such as preparing healthy snacks
  • Collaborate with your school cafeteria staff to highlight nutritious choices in the cafeteria
  • Invite your legislators to enjoy lunch with children in their district
  • Distribute fruits and vegetables as snacks during the day
  • Issue a pedometer challenge (or other physical activity challenge) and have competition among classes, grades or school faculty/staff
  • Host a school-wide Field Day or Activity Day
  • Invite your principal, town mayor, county officials or local celebrities to join a PE class
  • At a faculty or staff meeting, host an in-service on school health topics
  • Add a message about Child Health Week to your office marquee board or phone message

Need More Information?

For more information or resources, check out our website: health.tn.gov/mch or call us at 615-741-7353.


Resource Links for Schools

State Resources

A LEA must permit possession and self-administration of a prescribed, metered dosage, asthma-reliever inhaler as long as certain conditions are met. To learn more, refer to this site: http://tennessee.gov/sos/acts/103/pub/pc0493.pdf

Tennessee Department of Education – Building a Foundation for Academic Success
www.tn.gov/education/earlylearning/frcs.shtml

Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network
tspn.org/

Office of Coordinated School Health
www.tn.gov/education/schoolhealth/

Tennessee Department of Health
health.tn.gov

TENNderCare (TennCare’s EPSDT program)
www.tn.gov/tenncare/tenndercare/

Get Fit Tennessee
www.getfittn.com

Resources for Schools

Character Counts!
charactercounts.org/

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
www.violencepreventionworks.org/public/index.page

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

The Jason Foundation
jasonfoundation.com

National Alliance on Mental Illness
www.nami.org/

Suicide Prevention Resource Center
www.sprc.org/

Bright Futures Periodicity Schedule for Preventive Care
brightfutures.aap.org/clinical_practice.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

U.S. Surgeon General Calls to Action
www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/calls/

National Institutes of Health We Can! Program (Ways to Enhance Child Activity and Nutrition)
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/

Federal Policy Recommendations for Combating Childhood Obesity
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44206/

National Program for Playground Safety
www.playgroundsafety.org/

United States Department of Agriculture:

Fruit & Veggies More Matters
www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute:

Let’s Move—America’s Move to Raise a Healthier Generation of Kids
www.letsmove.gov/about/

Helping your overweight child
win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/over_child.htm

Healthy Recipes
www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy_eating/recipes.html

Body Mass Index Calculator for children & teens
apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Calculator.aspx

Portion Distortion--Serving Size Wallet Card
hp2010.nhlbihin.net/portion/servingcard7.pdf

Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity
www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/calls/obesity/

National Association of the State Boards of Education

Child Health Information & Prevention Resources
www.childhealthonline.org/

Let’s Move for Schools
www.letsmove.gov/schools

United States Department of Agriculture Team Nutrition classroom materials
teamnutrition.usda.gov/educators.html

Childhood Obesity Resource List
www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/pubs/childhoodobesity.pdf

PBS Teachers Health and Fitness Resources
www.pbslearningmedia.org/search/?q=*&selected_facets=supplemental_curriculumhierarchy_nodes_exact:80c6abea-153a-4c5a-a4a2-b746b70e41f5&display=Health%20and%20Physical%20Education 

Get Fit Tennessee resources for teachers
www.getfit.tn.gov/kids/teachers.aspx

National Center for Youth Issues
www.ncyi.org/www

Search Institute
www.search-institute.org/

Medical Institute for Sexual Health
www.medinstitute.org/

National Abstinence Education Association
www.abstinenceassociation.org/

The National Institute to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy
www.thenationalcampaign.org/

American Lung Association
www.lung.org/associations/states/tennessee/

United Healthcare

Best Bones Forever

4Girls.gov
Be Healthy. Be Happy. Be You. Beautiful.

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Faith-Based

How Can Your Faith-Based Community Participate?

  • Post information in your congregation newsletter or bulletin
  • Write a column in your community newsletter
  • Host a health event like a Body Mass Index or cholesterol screening or a health fair
  • Hold an open house for programs related to fitness/health
  • Organize a cook-off for healthy foods—let your youth be the judge
  • Plan hands-on activities, such as instruction in preparing healthy snacks
  • Have a “healthy potluck” meal in which your congregation brings healthy food to share
  • Issue a pedometer challenge or other physical activity challenges.
    Set goals and issue the challenge among different age groups, classes, etc.
  • Plan a congregation-wide activity day

Need More Information?

For more information or resources, check out our website: health.tn.gov/mch or call us at 615-741-7353.


Resource Links for Faith-Based Communities

Resources Specifically for Faith-Based Communities

Suicide Prevention Materials for Clergy
hhd.org/resources/story/suicide-prevention-materials-clergy-and-faith-based-communities

American Association of Suicideology
http://www.suicidology.org/

Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network
tspn.org/

TN Department of Health Office of Faith-Based Initiatives (health.state.tn.us/DMHDE/faith.shtml)

Eat Smart Move More North Carolina 
Resources for Faith-Based Communities

Lighten Up Forever: 
A Faith-Based Approach to Lifestyle Change
www.lightenupforever.org/index.htm

Additional Resources

Tennessee Department of Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Shape Up America!
www.shapeup.org/

The Surgeon General's Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity
dnrc.nih.gov/reports/surgeon_general.asp

National Institutes of Health We can! Program (Ways to Enhance Child Activity and Nutrition)
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/index.htm

United States Department of Agriculture

Fruit & Veggies More Matters
www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Helping your overweight child
win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/over_child.htm

Weekly Meal Planner
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/downloads/tip_planner.pdf

Healthy Weight-it’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle!
www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy_eating/recipes.html

BMI Calculator for children & teens
apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Calculator.aspx

Portion Distortion - Serving Size Wallet Card
hp2010.nhlbihin.net/portion/servingcard7.pdf

HealthFinder.gov provides credible, accurate information to help you choose to live a healthier life
healthfinder.gov/

Healthy Communities - Promoting Physical Activity
www.mrsc.org/subjects/humanservices/healthy/healthyactivity.aspx

International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
www.isbnpa.org/useful-links/

Body and Soul: A Celebration of Healthy Eating and Living
rtips.cancer.gov/rtips/viewProduct.do?viewMode=product&productId=257631

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Cities and Counties

How Can Your Community Participate?

  • Write an op-ed in your local paper about the importance of child health to your community
  • At a city or county council meeting, recognize the efforts of local citizens who
    are working to improve child health
  • Add a message about Child Health Week to your office marquee board or phone message
  • Host a panel discussion about ways to improve health in your community
  • Consider the impact of local rulemaking on child health and well-being
  • Spotlight local parks, community centers, and greenways as places where children
    and families can be physically active
  • Eat breakfast or lunch with local school students
  • Visit (and participate in!) a PE class at a local school
  • Walk to school with local students
  • Get your flu shot and invite the media to watch
  • Record a public service announcement promoting good health behaviors (getting a regular checkup, receiving immunizations, wearing a seatbelt and helmet, etc)
  • Visit local sites that are promoting good health, such as parks, farmers’ markets, community gardens, etc.
  • Host a community fitness event, like a walk in the park
  • Host a “healthy recipe” contest in your office and let local families be the judges
  • Have local children draw pictures related to healthy living and display them in your office
    during Child Health Week
  • Visit a local school and talk with students and staff about the importance of healthy lifestyles
  • Be a good role model for your constituents
  • Issue a physical activity or healthy eating challenge for your staff

Need More Information?

For more information or resources, check out our website: health.tn.gov/mch or call us at 615-741-7353.


Resource Links for Cities and Counties

Designing Active Communities: Promoting Health Lives: www.activeliving.org/
Focuses on how the built environment-including neighborhoods, transportation systems, buildings, parks and open space-can promote more active lives.

Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities: www.healthykidshealthycommunities.org/
A national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation whose primary goal is to implement healthy eating and active living policy and environmental change initiatives that can support healthier communities for children and families across the United States.

CDC Healthy Communities Program:  www.cdc.gov/healthycommunitiesprogram/
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its partners are working together to create healthy, thriving communities across the United States by reducing chronic diseases and attaining health equity through training, mentorship, dissemination of effective models, and investments in communities that jump-start local change.

Let’s Move:  Ideas for Mayors & Local Officials: www.letsmove.gov/mayors-local-officials
Elected officials offer the unique ability to spur action and bring communities together in this movement. Mayors and municipal officials are encouraged to adopt a long-term, sustainable, and holistic approach to fighting childhood obesity. This movement recognizes that every city is different, and every town will require its own distinct approach to the issue.

Let’s Move: Ideas for Community Leaders: www.letsmove.gov/community-leaders
Neighborhood organizations and faith-based groups are well positioned to initiate and coordinate activities to encourage healthy living and well being. Trusted leaders in communities and congregations can empower families and communities to make better choices to improve the health of our nation’s children.

Community Toolbox: ctb.ku.edu/en/default.aspx
A global resource for free information on essential skills for building healthy communities.

American Community Gardening Association: communitygarden.org/
Supports community gardening by facilitating the formation and expansion of state and regional community gardening networks; developing resources in support of community gardening; and, encouraging research and conducting educational programs.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center: www.walkinginfo.org/index.cfm
A national clearinghouse for information about health and safety, engineering, advocacy, education, enforcement, access and mobility for pedestrians (including transit users) and bicyclists. The PBIC serves anyone interested in pedestrian and bicycle issues, including planners, engineers, private citizens, advocates, educators, law enforcement and the health community.

International Bicycle Fund
Community Bicycle Programs:
 ibike.org/
Listing of groups that are facilitating more bicycling in their communities.

Healthy Stores: www.healthystores.org/
The Healthy Stores projects aim to improve health and prevent obesity and disease in low-income communities through culturally appropriate store-based interventions that increase the supply of healthy foods and promote their purchase.

The Food Trust:  www.thefoodtrust.org/index.php
The Food Trust strives to make healthy food available to all by working with neighborhoods, schools, grocers, farmers and policymakers to develop a comprehensive approach that combines nutrition education and greater availability of affordable, healthy food.

Society of St. Andrew: http://www.endhunger.org/

  • Gleaning Network
    Volunteers glean nutritious produce from farmers' fields and orchards after the harvest. This food is delivered to those in need.
  • Potato & Produce Project
    Truckloads of unmarketable potatoes and other produce, donated by the agricultural community, are delivered to agencies serving the poor.
  • Harvest of Hope
    Our education program informs people about the hunger problem and encourages them to be part of the solution.

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Updated August 2012